BSA B44 Victor Grand Prix

 

 

 

Make Model

BSA B44 Victor Grand Prix

Year

1965 - 68

Engine

Single cylinder, 4-stroke,OHV, 2 valves

Capacity

441 cc / 26.9 cub in.
Bore x Stroke 79 x 90 mm
Cooling System Air cooled
Compression Ratio 11.4:1
Lubrication Dry sump
Oil Capacity 2.4 L / 5.1 US pints
Carburetor Amal
Exhaust Single, stainless stee, high level

Ignition 

Coil and magneto
Spark Plug Champion N64Y, 0.20  in. gap
Starting Kick start

Max Power

21.9 KW / 30 hp @ 6500 rpm
Clutch Wet, multi-plate

Transmission 

4-Speed
Final Drive Chain
Overall Gear Ratios 1st 15.40 / 2nd 11.42 / 3rd 8.65 / 4th 6.97:1
Frame Tubular steel, cradle

Steering Head Angle

63°

Front Suspension

Telescopic hydraulic forks

Rear Suspension

Swing arm, pivoted on bonded rubber bush, telescopic damper and coil spring

Front Brakes

7 in., drum

Rear Brakes

7 in., drum
Front Wheel WM1-20
Rear Wheel WM3-18

Front Tyre

3.00 x 20in.

Rear Tyre

4.00 x 18 in

Dimensions

Length:  2070 mm / 81.5 in.

Width:      813 mm / 32 in.

Wheelbase 1349 mm / 53 in.
Ground Clearance 203 mm / 8 in.
Seat Height 813 mm / 32 in.
Dry Weight 116 kg / 255 lbs

Fuel Capacity 

6.8 L / 1.8 US gal
Colours Yellow/silver, Silver
Source Wikipedia

In 1965 an off road motocross BSA B44 named the ‘’Victor’’ was launched at the Earls Court Show. Developed from scramblers used by Jeff Smith to win the 1964 and 1965 500cc World Championships, the model proved so popular that Victor Grand Prix and Victor Enduro models were developed, as well as a road-going version, the 1967 Victor Roadster. The Victor Grand Prix Scrambler had a displacement of 441cc, and the Enduro model was known as the 441 Victor in the United States. BSA began offering a road version, the B44VR Victor Roadster, in 1967. When that model was exported to U.S. dealers in 1968, the name was changed to the B44SS Shooting Star. The B44VS Victor Special was also successfully exported to the US between 1968 and 1970.

In 1968 the B44 became BSA's top export model. The good availability of spare parts and the relative simplicity of the single-cylinder engine meant that the surviving examples are easily restored to as-new condition.