BSA Super Rocket (A10)

 

 

 

 

Make Model

BSA Super Rocket

Year

1959 - 63

Engine

OHV, Parallel twin

Capacity

646cc / 39.4 cub in.
Bore x Stroke 70 x 84 mm
Carburetor Amal TT racing
Cooling System Air cooled
Compression Ratio 8.3:1
Lubrication Dry sump
Exhaust Twin, stainless steel

Ignition 

Lucas magneto

Battery

6V

Starting Kick start

Max Power

37 kW / 50 hp @ 6250 rpm
Clutch Multi-plate with built-in cush drive

Transmission 

4 Speed
Final Drive Chain
Gear Ratio 1st 11.68 / 2nd 7.96 / 3rd 5.48 / 4th 4.53:1
Frame Welded seamless steel tubing with duplex downtubes and full cradle engine support, bolted-on rear sub frame

Front Suspension

Telescopic forks with coil spring - hydraulically damped

Rear Suspension

Swinging arm

Front Brakes

Drum, 8 in.

Rear Brakes

Drum, 7 in.
Braking Distance (both wheels from 32 km/h / 20 mph 4 m / 13 ft
Wheels Steel, wire spokes

Front Tyre

3.25 x 19 in., ribbed

Rear Tyre

4.00 x 19 in.

Dimensions

Length:  2100 mm / 84.0 in.

Wheelbase 1391 mm / 54.75 in.
Wet Weight 170 kg / 375 lbs

Fuel Capacity 

16 L / 4.2 US gal

Average Fuel Consumption

4.7 L/100 km / 21.3 km/l / 50 US mpg

Top Speed 187 km/h / 116 mph
Standing Quarter Mile (400 m) 14.1 sec.
Colours Sapphire blue/chrome, Red/chrome
Source Wikipedia
 

The Super Rocket has a near-three-figure cruising speed – a performance to meet the autobahn ambitions of foreign-touring enthusiasts, or those who buy motorcycles with an optimistic eye to the extension of motorway travel at home in the not too distant future. On the other hand, the current model can be throttled back to accept happily the inevitable limitations of built-up-area riding. In these less spectacular circumstances, one's patience in jogging along at 30mph is rewarded by a remarkable - for a lusty 650cc twin - fuel consumption also in the three-figure class.' - Motor Cycling.

BSA's range for 1955 embodied several novel features. Alongside the existing plunger-framed machines were new models equipped with swinging-arm rear suspension, while the A7 Shooting Star and A10 Road Rocket sports twins came with new aluminium-alloy cylinder heads. The latter produced a highly respectable 40bhp, and as tested by Motor Cycling magazine was found capable of reaching 109mph. For 1958 the sports 650 became the Super Rocket, gaining a revised cylinder head, Amal Monobloc carburettor and an extra 3bhp. The model lasted into the unitary construction era and was last produced in 1963.