Classic Bikes

Custom Bikes

Racing Bikes

 

AC Schnitzer

AJP

AJS

Alfer

Aprilia

Ariel

Arlen Ness

ATK

Bajaj

Bakker

Barigo

Benelli

Beta

Big Bear

BigDog

Bimota

BMS Choppers

BMW

Borile

Boss Hoss

Boxer

Brammo

Britten

BRP Can-am

BSA

Buell

Bultaco

Cagiva

Campagna

CCM

Confederate

CR&S

Daelim

Deus

Derbi

DP Customs

Drysdale

Ducati

Dunstall

Exile Cycles

Factory Bike

Fischer

Foggy Petronas

GASGAS

Ghezzi Brain

Gilera

Harris

Harley Davidson

HDT

Hesketh

Highland

Honda

HPN

Horex

Husqvarna

Husaberg

Hyosung

Indian

Italjet

Jawa

Kawasaki

KTM

KYMCO

Laverda

Lazareth

Lehman Trikes

LIFAN

Magni

Maico

Matchless

Matt Hotch

Megelli

Midual

Mission

Mondial

Moto Guzzi

Moto Morini

MotoCzysz

Motus

Mr Martini

MTT

Münch

MV Agusta

MZ

NCR

Norton

Oberdan Bezzi

OCC

Paul Jr. Designs

Piaggio

Radical Ducati

Rickman

Ridley

Roehr

Roland Sands

Royal Enfield

Rucker

Sachs

Saxon

Sherco

Suzuki

Titan

TM Racing

Triumph

Ural
Velocette

Victory

Viper

Vincent

Vilner

VOR

Voxen

Vyrus

Wakan / Avinton

Walz

Wrenchmonkees

Wunderlich

Yamaha

Zero

   

Brough Superior 1000 1930-39

 

 

 

Brooklands is now but a memory to some motorcyclists—and only a legend to the vast majority who, like the author, have never seen a race meeting there. The famous concrete bowl at Weybridge, Surrey, was responsible for a lot of development of British machines—and also responsible for the development of a lot of mounts designed just for record breaking.

The outer circuit lap record was, of course, the "ultimate" for a small band of riders, headed by Noel Pope, in the immediate pre-war years. He acquired a very famous Brough Superior, a "blown" 1,000 c.c. monster built at the end of 1930 for E. C. E. Baragwanath who then won innumerable events with it in sidecar trim. When "Barry" used it an "8-50" model J.A.P. engine was employed, with one exhaust port facing forwards and one back, at that time the latest product of the J.A.P. factory at Tottenham.

Pope dispensed with the sidecar, swopped the engine for an "8-80" type (both were 80 mm. x 99 mm. o.h.v. 998 c.c. Vee-twins) that in unblown form produced about 80 b.h.p. With the blower on he had a fantastically quick device, and on July 4, 1939, he took his rigid framed monster round to record 124-51 m.p.h.—destined to be the fastest ever two-wheeler lap of the track. He was timed at 137 m.p.h. over a flying half-mile, a truly remarkable performance in view of the track's extremely bumpy surface.

The machine still exists today, in the hands of Vintage Club Founder C. E. Allen, who has rebuilt it to the trim in which "Barry" first made it—when it would do over the 100 m.p.h. mark, with sidecar!

SPECIFICATION
Engine: 50° Vee-twin J.A.P. type "8-80" 1,000 c.c.
o.h.v.; chain-driven supercharger in front of
crankcase; pushrod valve operation. Ignition: two twin-spark magnetos. Transmission: chain drive via three-speed Sturmey
Archer gearbox. Frame: single down-tube cradle; no rear springing. Forks: Castle bottom-link.