Home   Contact   Converter   Video   Technical 

  

 

 

Classic Bikes

Custom Bikes

Racing Bikes

 

AC Schnitzer

AJP

AJS

Alfer

Aprilia

Ariel

Arlen Ness

ATK

Bajaj

Bakker

Barigo

Benelli

Beta

Big Bear

BigDog

Bimota

BMS Choppers

BMW

Borile

Boss Hoss

Boxer

Brammo

Britten

BRP Can-am

BSA

Buell

Bultaco

Cagiva

Campagna

CCM

Confederate

CR&S

Daelim

Deus

Derbi

DP Customs

Drysdale

Ducati

Dunstall

Exile Cycles

Factory Bike

Fischer

Foggy Petronas

GASGAS

Ghezzi Brain

Gilera

Harris

Harley Davidson

HDT

Hesketh

Highland

Honda

HPN

Horex

Husqvarna

Husaberg

Hyosung

Indian

Italjet

Jawa

Kawasaki

KTM

Kymco

Laverda

Lazareth

Lehman Trikes

LIFAN

Magni

Maico

Matchless

Matt Hotch

Megelli

Midual

Mission

Mondial

Moto Guzzi

Moto Morini

MotoCzysz

Motus

Mr Martini

MTT

Münch

MV Agusta

MZ

NCR

Norton

Oberdan Bezzi

OCC

Paul Jr. Designs

Piaggio

Radical Ducati

Rickman

Ridley

Roehr

Roland Sands

Royal Enfield

Rucker

Sachs

Saxon

Sherco

Suzuki

Titan

TM Racing

Triumph

Ural
Velocette

Victory

Viper

Vincent

Vilner

VOR

Voxen

Vyrus

Wakan / Avinton

Walz

Wrenchmonkees

Wunderlich

Yamaha

Zero

   

Laverda 750GT "America Eagle"
 

 

 

 

 

Make Model

Laverda 750GT "America Eagle"

Year

1968

Engine

Air cooled, four stroke, parallel twin cylinder.

Capacity

753.9
Bore x Stroke 80 x 74 mm
Compression Ratio 7.7:1

Induction

2x 30mm Dell'Orto vhb30

Ignition  /  Starting

 

Max Power

52 hp @ 6900 rpm

Transmission  /  Drive

5 Speed  /  chain

Front Suspension

Marzocchi telescopic forks

Rear Suspension

Swinging arm dual shocks

Front Brakes

Single 230mm drum

Rear Brakes

200mm Drum

Front Tyre

3.50-18

Rear Tyre

4.00-18

Wet-Weight

218 kg

Fuel Capacity

19 Litres

The American Eagle Saga

Jack McCormack was the man who first brought Laverda's big twin to the United States. In mid-1968, McCormack, together with three or four ex-Triumph and ex-Suzuki distributors (including Johnson Motors, West Coast), founded American Eagle International Motors Incorporated. Their aim was to offer year-round leisure vehicles, which were to come not only from Laverda, but also from the likes of Sprite and Kawasaki. There were also plans for beach buggies, snowmobiles and vehicles for other leisure-time activities. (The enterprise was largely funded by a payout made to McCormack and his partners, after they had successfully sued Suzuki's Japanese parent company, which had taken over Suzuki's US distribution.)

McCormack had also earlier worked for both the Triumph and Honda American distribution networks. In an article on the American Eagle project, Classic Bike in its October 1997 issue described McCormack, as 'an ex-Marine and golden-tongued salesman'. In the same feature, McCormack himself stated that the Laverda 650 twin 'struck me as a very advanced motorcycle. When I went to Italy and met with Massimo to discuss the idea of importing it, I persuaded him to make it a 750.'

McCormack's claim to having invented the 750 is doubtful, as the machine (with a Laverda, rather than an American Eagle badge) had already gone on sale in Europe in May of that year. He certainly could, however, claim to have at least influenced Laverda, inspiring them to build a super sport for the US market.

The first Stateside test report of the Laverda 750 twin was published in the August 1968 issue of Cycle World. McCormack's PR machine was in full flow when Cycle World claimed that 'the 750 is

produced solely for America, after McCormack International requested this move. The McCormack International group also obtained other modifications for the express benefit of US riders.' Close study of the 1968 European Laverda 750 and its American Eagle brother shows them to be virtually identical except for the handlebar bend.

The story of the American Eagle was to be cut short by the launch of the Honda CB750 four only a few months later. Effectively, the

AMERICAN EAGLE 750cc SUPER SPORT

Japanese giant shut out McCormack's big twin, being $200 less than the American Eagle (at $1495), and also offering two more cylinders and a disc brake into the bargain.

The result was that few of the big Laverdas actually arrived in the USA, maybe no more than 150 in total. McCormack and his men were soon struggling financially, and were ultimately forced into liquidation. For many years, the saga has been related as an example of how not to establish a bike importing business...

 

NOTE: Any correction or more information on these motorcycles will kindly be appreciated, Some country's motorcycle specifications can be different to motorcyclespecs.co.za. Confirm with your motorcycle dealer before ordering any parts or spares. Any objections to articles or photos placed on motorcyclespecs.co.za will be removed upon request.    Privacy Policy      Contact Me