Derbi Mulhacén 659 

 

 

 

Make Model

Derbi Mulhacén 659 

Year

2005 -

Engine

Four stroke, single cylinder, SOHC, 4 valves per cylinder.

Capacity

659.7 cc / 40.2 cu-in
Bore x Stroke 100 x 84 mm
Cooling System Liquid cooled
Compression Ratio 10.0;1

Induction

Fuel injection 44mm throtlel bodies

Ignition

CDI
Starting Electric

Max Power

48.6 hp / 36.2 kW @ 6000 rpm
Clutch Multi-plate

Transmission

5 Speed 
Final Drive Chain
Frame Aluminium trellis

Front Suspension

43mm Upside down forks, 120mm wheel travel.
Front Wheel Travel 120 mm / 4.7 in

Rear Suspension

Progressive lateral link, 110mm wheel travel.
Rear Wheel Travel 120 mm / 4.7 in

Front Brakes

Single 320mm disc 4 piston calliper

Rear Brakes

Single 240mm disc 1 piston calliper

Front Tyre

120/80 -18

Rear Tyre

150/70 -18
Length 2120 mm / 83.4 in
Wheelbase 1386 mm / 54.5 in
Seat Height 810 mm / 31.8 in

Dry Weight

160 kg / 352.4 lbs

Fuel Capacity

13 Litres / 3.4 US gal

Consumption  average

23.6  km/lit

Standing Ľ Mile  

14.3 sec

Top Speed

 168.0 km/h

Named after the tallest mountain in Spain, the Derbi Mulhacén 659 is the largest-displacement motorcycle ever produced by Spain. Built by Minarelli for Yamaha in Italy, the fuel-injected, sohc, four-valve, liquid-cooled Single is a willing mill, producing 47 horsepower at 6250 rpm and 41 foot-pounds of torque at 5500 rpm. The dry-sump engine serves as a stressed member of the tubular-steel frame, the front downtubes of which double as an oil tank. A 43mm Marzocchi inverted fork handles suspension duties up front, while at the rear a link-actuated shock is offset to the right side of the cast-aluminum swingarm. Wheelbase is 54.5 inches.

Weighing a claimed 357 pounds dry, the Mulhacén feels light and accelerates briskly. Naturally, the 659 is best-suited to dancing through the corners of a twisty mountain road, where it is quick and sure-footed. The front brake—a radial-pump Brembo master cylinder mated to a radial-mount four-piston caliper pinching a 320mm stainless-steel rotor—is a good compromise, especially if you plan to ride off-road; but if Nennewitz proceeds as planned to design a road-only version with 17-inch wheels and radial tires, a twin-rotor setup is a must.

At 32.6 inches, the seat is rather tall, but its narrowness where it meets the gas tank allows 6-footers to easily reach the ground. Shorter riders will have to tiptoe to maintain their balance at stops. This is one detail of the project that needs to be revised. Since seat padding is already thin, though, lowering the seat may require re-designing the subframe.

Source  Cycle World: