BV 125 (Beverly) 2002
BV 250 (Beverly) 2006-10
BV 350 (Beverly) 2014
BV 350 (Beverly) 2015
BV 500 2005-12
Fly 50 2007
Fly 50 2008
Fly 50 2014
Fly 150 2005-13
Fly 150 2014
   
Liberty 125 2014
LT 50 2003-04
LT 150 2003-04
MP3 125 2006-07
MP3 125 2008-09
MP3 125LT Hybrid 2009
MP3 125 2010-11
MP3 125ie 2012
MP3 250 2006-07
MP3 250 2010-11
MP3 250 2012-13
MP3 250 2014
MP3 300 Hybrid 2010
MP3 300ie 2012
MP3 400 2007-08
MP3 400 ABS 2009-10
MP3 400 2011
MP3 400ie 2012
MP3 400ie Touring 2012
MP3 400 2014
MP3 500 2006-07
MP3 500 2008-09
MP3 500 2010-11
MP3 500 Sport Touring 2012
MP3 500 2013
MP3 500 2014
MP3 500 2015
Typhoon 50 2005-08
Typhoon 50 2012-14
Typhoon 125 2014
X-EVO 125 Sport 2014
X8 125 2006-07
X8 200 2006
X8 250 2006-07
X8 400 2007
X9 500 2001
X9 Evolution 125 2005
X9 Evolution 250 2005
X9 Evolution 500 2005
X9 Evolution 500 ABS 2006
X10 125 2012
X10 350 2012
X10 500 2012
Zip 50 2T 2014

Piaggio based in Pontedera, Italy encompasses seven brands producing scooters and motorcycles. As the fourth largest producer of scooters and motorcycles in the world, Piaggio produces more than 600,000 vehicles annually, with five Research and development centers, more than 6,700 employees and operations in over 50 countries. Piaggio was founded by Rinaldo Piaggio, in Genoa, Italy, in 1884.

Founded in Genoa in 1884 by twenty-year-old Rinaldo Piaggio, Piaggio initially undertook luxury ship fitting before going on to produce rail carriages, goods vans, luxury coaches and engines, trams and special truck bodies.

World War I brought a new diversification that was to distinguish Piaggio activities for many decades. The company started producing aeroplanes and seaplanes. At the same time, new plants were springing up.

In 1917 Piaggio bought a new plant in Pisa, and four years later it took over a small plant in Pontedera which first became the centre of aeronautical production (propellers, engines and complete aircraft, including the state-of-the-art Piaggio P108 in passenger and bomber versions).

Before and during World War II, Piaggio was one of Italy's top aircraft manufacturers. For this reason, its plants were important military targets and the Piaggio factories in Genoa, Finale Ligure and Pontedera were irrevocably damaged by the war.

The 1946 Invention
Rinaldo Piaggio's sons Enrico and Armando began the process of re-starting industrial production immediately after the war. The hardest task went to Enrico, who was responsible for the destroyed Pontedera plant. He arranged for part of the machinery transferred to Biella in Piedmont to be brought back.

Enrico Piaggio opted for an industrial reconversion, focusing on personal mobility in a country emerging from war. He gave shape to his intuition, building a vehicle destined to become extremely famous, thanks to the extraordinary design work of the aeronautical engineer and inventor Corradino D'Ascanio (1891-1981).

Vespa:

The Birth of a Legend
The Vespa (which means "wasp" in Italian) was the result of Enrico Piaggio's determination to create a low cost product for the masses. As the war drew to a close, Enrico studied every possible solution to get production in his plants going again - starting from Biella, where a motor scooter was produced, based on a small motorcycle made for parachutists.