Home   Contact   Converter   Video   Technical 

  

 

 

Classic Bikes

Custom Bikes

Racing Bikes

 

AC Schnitzer

AJP

AJS

Alfer

Aprilia

Ariel

Arlen Ness

ATK

Bajaj

Bakker

Barigo

Benelli

Beta

Big Bear

BigDog

Bimota

BMS Choppers

BMW

Borile

Boss Hoss

Boxer

Brammo

Britten

BRP Can-am

BSA

Buell

Bultaco

Cagiva

Campagna

CCM

Confederate

CR&S

Daelim

Deus

Derbi

DP Customs

Drysdale

Ducati

Dunstall

Exile Cycles

Factory Bike

Fischer

Foggy Petronas

GASGAS

Ghezzi Brain

Gilera

Harris

Harley Davidson

HDT

Hesketh

Highland

Honda

HPN

Horex

Husqvarna

Husaberg

Hyosung

Indian

Italjet

Jawa

Kawasaki

KTM

Kymco

Laverda

Lazareth

Lehman Trikes

LIFAN

Magni

Maico

Matchless

Matt Hotch

Megelli

Midual

Mission

Mondial

Moto Guzzi

Moto Morini

MotoCzysz

Motus

Mr Martini

MTT

Münch

MV Agusta

MZ

NCR

Norton

Oberdan Bezzi

OCC

Paul Jr. Designs

Piaggio

Radical Ducati

Rickman

Ridley

Roehr

Roland Sands

Royal Enfield

Rucker

Sachs

Saxon

Sherco

Suzuki

Titan

TM Racing

Triumph

Ural
Velocette

Victory

Viper

Vincent

Vilner

VOR

Voxen

Vyrus

Wakan / Avinton

Walz

Wrenchmonkees

Wunderlich

Yamaha

Zero

   

Laverda 750GTL

 

 

 

Make Model

Laverda 750GTL

Year

1975

Engine

Air cooled, four stroke, parallel twin cylinder, SOHC, 2 valve per cylinder.

Capacity

744
Bore x Stroke 80 x 74 mm
Compression Ratio 7.7:1

Induction

2x 30mm Dell'Orto PHF  carbs.

Ignition  /  Starting

Bosch  /  electric

Max Power

65 hp @ 7000 rpm

Max Torque

Transmission  /  Drive

5 Speed  /  chain

Front Suspension

Ceriani telescopic forks

Rear Suspension

Swinging fork, Ceriani adjustable shocks

Front Brakes

2x 280mm discs

Rear Brakes

Single 280mm disc

Front Tyre

3.50-18

Rear Tyre

4.0-18

Dry Weight

218 kg

Fuel Capacity 

16 Litres

For the 1975 model year onwards, Laverda offered the 750 GTL. This employed the chassis and most of the mechanical components from the SF series, including the Francesco Laverda-designed, FLAM-produced 230mm drum front and rear brakes.

The concept and detail changes were the work of Laverda rider and journalist, Giancarlo Daneu. The original idea was for a refined touring mount, but in reality the factory produced very few for general sale. Instead, although it was a sales flop in the civilian market, the model went on to achieve considerable success as a police motorcycle, not just in Italy but also in the export markets, notably in the Arab countries of the Middle East.

Besides its all-new bodywork, the GTL also sported rubber fork gaiters, a passenger grab rail and high handlebars. For police work, a fairing, legshields, crashbars, hard panniers and a radio carrier were fitted, the latter in conjunction with a single seat.

The softer engine specification of the GTL made it ideal for tasks such as traffic duty and escort work. Besides a lower 7.7:1 compression ratio there were smaller 30mm square slide VHB Dell'Orto carbs and reduced cam lift.

The early GTL had an enormous 200mm (8in) Bosch headlamp, but this was soon abandoned in favour of a 180mm (7in) assembly (also of Bosch origin).

Switchgear and instrumentation came via Nippon-Danso and there were all the other late SF goodies, such as Conti exhaust, stainless steel mudguards (and chainguard), Borrani alloy rims and dual Fiamm horns.

Just to add confusion, some machines employed an alternator instead of a dynamo - neither having a particular advantage over the other on this particular model. Some machines, especially in the Middle East, also came with an SF specification engine.

For the standard, low compression, small-carb model, official Laverda sources claimed a maximum speed of 180km/h (112mph).

 

NOTE: Any correction or more information on these motorcycles will kindly be appreciated, Some country's motorcycle specifications can be different to motorcyclespecs.co.za. Confirm with your motorcycle dealer before ordering any parts or spares. Any objections to articles or photos placed on motorcyclespecs.co.za will be removed upon request.    Privacy Policy      Contact Me