Sachs Roadster 800

 

 

 

Make Model

Sachs Roadster 800

Year

2001 - 03

Engine

Four stroke, V-twin, SOHC

Capacity

805 cc / 49.1 cu-in
Bore x Stroke 83 x 74.4 mm
Cooling System Liquid cooled
Compression Ratio 10.0:1

Induction

2x 36mm Mikuni carburetors
Lubrication Wet sump

Ignition 

Digital
Starting Electric

Max power

57 hp / 41.6 kW @ 6000rpm

Max Torque

71 Nm / 52.4 lb-ft @ 4000rpm
Clutch Wet, cable operated

Transmission 

5 Speed 
Final Drive Shaft
Frame Steel tubular type

Front Suspension

40mm upside down hydraulic fork

Rear Suspension

Twin telescopic shock

Front Brakes

2x 320mm discs  4 piston calipers

Rear Brakes

180mm drum

Front Tyre

120/70 ZR17

Rear Tyre

160/60 ZR17
Wheelbase 1480 mm / 58.3 in
Seat Height 770 mm / 30.3 in

Dry Weight

209 Kg / 460.8 lbs

Fuel Capacity 

17 Litres / 4.5 US gal

The Sachs boasts gorgeous design with excellent build quality and ought to be better than it is. It seems a bit busy, trying to be part roadster, part sportsbike, part cruiser and the result is a slightly disappointing, split-personality that doesn’t really deliver on any level. You can have fun and it’ll make you smile… But it’s unlikely to ever have you screaming into your crash helmet for more. 

Ride Quality & Brakes 3 out of 5

The handling’s pretty good, with wide bars, and it’s easy to tip in to corners. Push it harder and you’ll soon feel it’s weight, however. The brakes are fantastic and have loads of feel and the gearbox is good. It’s vibey through the bars and pegs at higher speeds whilst the suspension’s good, rather than great.
The V-twin engine’s a Suzuki number (it’s used to power their VL800 Intruder) and it’s very much a cruiser job which doesn’t sit entirely well in the Roadster’s chassis. It has plenty of torque, as you’d expect, low down and in the midrange, but still not quite enough power to match the bike’s flingable leanings. 

The Roadster’s built to a high standard but those gold-coloured USD forks do look slightly out of place. The engine’s a tough one, even if it doesn’t suit the bike terribly well, so reliability shouldn’t be a problem. Sachs’ bikes are hand built so precision and care in their construction is paramount. Good.